EVERY MONTH THE VISITORS OF OUR MUSEUM CHOOSE THE EXHIBIT THAT THEY LIKED THE MOST. FOR THE MONTH OF JULY IT SEEMS THAT... IT IS THE ROE DEER (CAPREOLUS CAPREOLUS) THAT DREW THEIR ATTENTION!

The roe deer is the smallest species in the deer family. It has a black muzzle and a white jaw. The male has horns with branches that fall each year and new ones grow in their place. A light-colored spot forms around its tail. Males outperform females in terms of body size and weight.

Its hair in summer is smooth, short, and reddish-brown, while in winter it becomes longer, thicker, and grayish. The lower parts of the body are light in color.

It is found in a wide range of habitats, but mainly in sparse broad-leaved forests, as well as in mixed ones with several gaps. It especially prefers marginal habitats such as forest boundaries with shrublands.

It is found in large populations in Central and Northern Europe. Small roe deer populations have remained in Greece in the mountainous areas of the Greek mainland. The species is classified as vulnerable, which means that if it continues being vanished, it will soon be threatened with extinction.


photo © xulescu_g, CC BY-SA 2.0